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Set your GPS: The location of
 St. James Park

FOR AN INTRODUCTION TO ST. JAMES PARK, CLICK HERE



AS WITH MANY EXCLUSIVE REAL ESTATE developments in Los Angeles, there have always been those nearby that have hitched their wagons to the originals—think of the phrase "Beverly Hills adjacent" in some offerings of houses actually in West Hollywood, for instance—and St. James Park was no exception. The broader area to the park's north and west were often promoted as being "in" St. James Park, including properties above 23rd Street and in the Ellis Tract west of Scarff Street on the map above. Perhaps because St. James Park was older than it neighbor, Chester Place, and not dominated by one family as was that Doheny stronghold, its air of preeminence was greater. (Borrowed prestige was also true of Berkeley Square, among other West Adams neighborhoods.) For our purposes here, however, we will confine ourselves to those residences—13 houses and two genteel apartments buildings—that, by our powers of blog authorship, we deem the addresses claiming a legitimate St. James Park imprimatur. "St. James Park," we so decree, is within the polygon, boldly numbered, centered on the actual open space of the same name, and outlined in red on the map above. Just below is a composite of Sanborn insurance maps that further display the buildings we are covering.



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You will notice that "St. James Park" comprises not just its central square and the roadways on its west and north sides but also the street between Adams Boulevard (née Adams Street) and 23rd, as well as the divided east-west roadway—originally designated as part of West 25th Street—between Chester Place and Scarff Street. As the rapacious Dohenys acquired as many of the original Chester Places houses as they could, they also bought three more along 25th/St. James Park and annexed them into their domain. (One of the latter was the Victorian extravaganza of Walter Scott Newhall, which many decades later became, in an art director's rendering, the home of television's The Addams Family.) Gates were placed approximately 225 feet to the east of the north-south St. James Park roadway leading from Adams; the east-west street was thereafter divided between the two developments, underscoring their rivalry for social renown.


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In later years, the roadway leading from Adams would be designated St. James Place. The streets surrounding the park itself were later identified in city directories as, oddly, St. James Park South, and the east-west street, St. James Park West. Today, the roadway at the east side of the park and all of its houses are gone, replaced by buildings of the Frank D. Lanterman High School. All that remains of the original architectural ensemble of St. James Park are the storied 1900 Stearns-Dockweiler house at #27; #13; #17#19; and #44, the now-combined structures of the two original apartment buildings at Scarff Street.





Illustrations: Historic Map WorksProquestGoogle Street View